Ethics

sc001e1715LandArc Landscaping & Design strives to create diverse, integrated, and dynamic spaces that incorporate sustainability, build community, and improve the quality of life.
The landscape is a living, breathing organism.  All of the parts are integrated in a harmonious and interdependent system.  Our ethics stand to balance human values and natural systems through the creation of multi-functional space and sensory-rich experience.  Inspired by the wild nature of the Oregon landscape, patterns and processes are borrowed from the native ecosystems and incorporated in the design of residential and commercial landscapes.
Landscapes speak a language.  Perspect.Pond_1Creative solutions are interpreted through Innovative Design with the use of both digital and analogue rendering techniques. Design phases include schematic design, design development, and construction documentation.  These landscape designs are followed up with a thoughtful and creative building project.
Cedar Arbor with GateThe built structures are the bones of the landscape.  Fine woodwork and creative details are integrated in the construction decks, fences, pergolas, and other outdoor structures.  Stone sets the foundation to solidify and ground a landscape space.  Natural stone and concrete pavers are used to build pathways, patios, and retaining walls.
Plants bring life into the landscape. They provide food, medicine, DSC02933habitat, shade, color, texture, and architectural form.  A native plant pallet is preferred in most landscape designs since natives have adapted over time to the local climate and soils.  Native plants require less maintenance and conserve on water use.  The local wildlife (butterflies, bees, birds, etc.) are more adapted to native plants as a food source and habitat.  However, non-native plants do have a place in the landscape and are often integrated into the landscape where appropriate.
“A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.”            — Aldo Leopold